e this year and plans to ca

#1 by sakura698 , Fri Jan 17, 2020 1:33 pm

COPENHAGEN Just minutes into Wednesdays practice, an irritated Brent Sutter stopped the proceedings and called the 25 players over for a stern talking-to. Clearance Nike Shox . The message was simple. "We needed to be better," the head coach of the Canadian junior hockey team explained. "We need to make sure we form an identity, make sure we have an element to our hockey team that we have to have and thats to be a hard-working team, thats to be a team thats going to play in a way that needs to be played. "Everyone knows that its a skilled group, everybody knows that its a group thats elite in its age group in Canada, but theres intangibles and things that we need to continue to get better at: competing, working, playing hard, winning battles, making sure were responsible defensively, making sure that, in the offensive zone, we got guys going to the net, all the things you need to do to be a successful team. "Practice didnt start off the way I liked and I just addressed it." And if the words werent enough, Sutter put his charges through more than 30 minutes of battle drills, including one called "The Gauntlet." That drill saw all the players line the side boards and then, one-by-one, each would skate down the line on the inside getting body checked every few strides. WATCH: Canadian players go through The Gauntlet: http://bit.ly/19TkOeR "Thats probably the old school coming out of me a little bit," said the 51-year-old Sutter, who is the owner, general manager and head coach of the Western Hockey Leagues Red Deer Rebels. "Its about getting the guys involved. You got to get in the trenches to win hockey games. Youre going to have to give hits and take hits, especially along the boards. The ice surface over here is obviously a little bit bigger, but the board-work and the trench-work is still a big part of the game. "Its just something to get the guys engaged. And you saw it here today, after we did a couple of those types of drills, the guys were more in sync and more in tune with their emotional level, their intensity level picked up." Sutter has employed this drill in the past, notably ahead of the 2007 Canada-Russia Super Series, which saw his team post a dominant 7-0-1 record. But most of the players on the ice in the Danish capital on Wednesday hadnt gone through "The Gauntlet" in quite some time, if at all. "That was a first for me," admitted Derrick Pouliot, a Portland Winterhawks defenceman drafted by the Pittsburgh Penguins eighth overall in 2012. "Thats definitely old school. I wasnt sure what was going on and then he said to go through everybody and I was like, Ooooookay." "My dad used to do it with our teams in minor hockey," said centre Scott Laughton, a Flyers prospect, who captains the Oshawa Generals in the Ontario Hockey League. "I think some of the boys were wondering what was going on, but I knew what was up. It was pretty cool to see." "I used to do that when I was a little younger in minor hockey when I first started hitting," said London Knights forward Bo Horvat, who was picked ninth overall by the Canucks in June. "It was good to get the boys going, a little team bonding and I think the boys really enjoyed that." But "The Gauntlet" was far from the only battle drill employed by Sutter, who has a well-earned reputation for demanding discipline, including asking that players shave facial hair and cut any long hair before coming to camp. On Wednesday, he also had the team gather around the centre-ice circle and watch as two guys battled for the puck. "You definitely put more effort into it when you see the whole team there," said Laughton. "I think it brings the guys together when you battle together and you battle with each other. I think it really sends a message." "Everybodys watching," added Horvart, "and you dont want to look stupid out there or anything like that." The battle drills and Sutters speech were designed to set the template for the teams identity. Canada hasnt won a gold medal at the world junior championship in four years and last year missed the podium altogether, snapping a 14-year medal streak. Sutter, who has an unblemished record behind the world junior bench, leading Canada to titles in 2005 and 2006, was brought in to right the ship. "Canadas never won anything when they thought they could win it strictly on skill," Sutter said. "Youve got to have those other things and it doesnt matter at what level. Its stuff that we have to continue to dig in with these guys and get them to understand. And theyre a pretty receptive group, very coachable group and theyre sponges and it showed today." "Weve got to take it day-by-day," said Laughton, a top contender to be Canadas captain when the tournament opens on Boxing Day. "Thats the most important thing and just be a hard-nosed team to play against. Play Canadian hockey: good on the forecheck and good on the cycle. We got a bunch of big guys that can move pretty well so I think thats going to be the identity." "We want to be a hard team to play against," said Horvat. "We want to play hard every game, take it day-by-day, and that message definitely got across at practice." Sutter wants his team to remain humble and hungry so he wasnt thrilled to learn the oddsmakers at Bodog have installed Canada as 7/4 favourites to win the gold medal. The defending champion Americans, host Swedes and Russians, who beat Canada in the bronze medal game a year ago, were all 3/1. "Last I saw, another team won the gold medal last year and we finished fourth so people can say what they need to say on the outside, but we have a lot of work ahead of us," said Sutter. "Youre always favoured. Canada is always favoured, because its our game, you know, its Canada and thats all perception on the outside. But the ones inside, weve got to get busy, get to work, theres a lot of work involved and we got to dig in. "We havent won here in a while so weve got to get back to playing the way we need to play and if we want to have a chance in this tournament, its not going to be strictly based on skill." Vapormax Womens Clearance . 1-9 on TSN. With more than 65 hours of exclusive live coverage, TSN delivers all the action beginning with Draw 1 on Saturday, Feb. 1 at 2 p. Nike Air Zoom Outlet . It is unclear how long Kallstrom, who was brought in to alleviate the teams midfield problems, will be sidelined. Arsenals communications director, Mark Gonnella, says the club decided to proceed with Kallstroms signing despite the injury. http://www.nikeshoesoutletwholesale.com/nike-air-vapormax-sale/vapormax-mens-cheap.html .Bekker was added Wednesday in exchange for allocation money after two seasons with Toronto. The native of Canada had 29 MLS appearances, including 16 starts. Hes also played in 13 games for the Canadian national team. LA QUINTA, Calif. -- Patrick Reed got an early start in golf. "When I was born, there was a golf club in my crib," Reed said. He got a big jump on the field in the Humana Challenge, too, shooting three straight 9-under 63s to take a seven-stroke lead into the final round. Struggling with the pace of his putts, he needed almost all of that cushion Sunday, closing with a 1-under 71 at PGA West to beat Ryan Palmer by two strokes. "A lot tougher than the first three rounds," Reed said. "My speed was off today. I left a lot of putts short. It seemed like the first three days the ball was just trickling over the front edge, and today it seemed like it came to a screeching halt." Finally resembling the guy who talked Saturday about being in a "putting coma," Reed ran in an 18-footer for birdie on the par-3 15th to push his lead to three strokes. "It felt comfortable. It felt great," Reed said. "I was able to play the last three holes just for par rather than trying to make birdies or trying to make something happen." He did par the last three to finish at 28-under 260 in the three-course event that he opened and closed on the Arnold Palmer Private Course. The 23-year-old Reed has two victories in his first 46 PGA Tour starts, winning the Wyndham Championship in August. He jumped from 69th to 41st in the world ranking, enough to lock up a spot in the 64-man Match Play Championship. "I always play to try to prove to everybody that I belong out here," Reed said. "As well as, I belong, not only out here on the PGA Tour, but also with the best players in the world." Reed took a call from former President Bill Clinton -- the tournament is run in partnership with the Clinton Foundation -- during his interview session. "He told me to get myself back in that zone more often," Reed said. "Because he said it was a lot of fun to watch." Palmer made a 15-foot eagle putt on the final hole for a 63. "What can you do with what Patrick did this week?" Palmer said. "Its ridiculous what he did. Amazing how good he played. Well come up a couple short, but it was a win in my game because I was playing for second today." Zach Johnson and Justin Leonard tied for third at 25 under. Johnson birdied the final five holes for a 62, the besst round of the week. Nike Cortez Mens Sale. "I got red hot at the end," Johnson said. The Kapalua winner is taking a four-week break. "Hopefully, I can maintain where Im at," Johnson said. Leonard parred his last two for a 65. "Would love to have made a few more putts," Leonard said. Other than the 18-footer on No. 15, the longest putt Reed holed was a 5-footer for par on the par-4 13th. That was a crucial putt after he played the previous eight holes in 1 over with four bogeys and three birdies. "I knew that if I didnt make that putt, then it was going to get interesting," Reed said. "To make that putt kind of gave me a little bit more fire saying, All right, well, were running out of holes for people to make a lot of birdies." Reed missed two 6-foot par putts and an 8-footer and dropped another stroke with a poor bunker shot on the par-3 12th. "It would either just stop just short, or it would break at the very end and break off the planet and lip out," Reed said. "It seemed like nothing would go in." On Saturday, Reed broke the PGA Tour record for relation to par for the first 54 holes, finishing at 27 under. He also became the first player in tour history to open with three rounds of 63 or better. On Sunday, he became the second player in the event to lead wire-to-wire, joining 1977 winner Rik Massengale. "To have a day where I felt like I had probably about my C or D game and still shoot under par, and to close off a victory, that means a lot to me," Reed said. Reeds wife, Justine, is pregnant with their first child, forcing her to turn over caddieing duties to her brother, Kessler Karain. She has walked every hole this year and plans to caddie again after the baby arrives around Memorial Day. "I cant wait to be a dad and have a little girl running around," Reed said. After helping Augusta State win NCAA titles in 2010 and 2011, Reed drew attention in 2012 when he successfully Monday-qualified for six events. He earned his tour card in December 2012, surviving six rounds of Q-school at PGA West. "We have worked so hard at it," Reed said. "Especially, with my wife and I, how hard we have worked the past 2 1/2 years, through Q-School, through the Monday qualifiers, and through here to get two wins in less than half a year." ' ' '

sakura698  
sakura698
Posts: 811
Date registered 11.04.2019


   

ays elbow hit to the head of Mike
n in February, arguing that the u

Xobor Create your own Forum with Xobor